Thursday, March 26, 2015

What Are My Needs As An English Language Teacher?





 Students guided through learning module that asks and collects questions.
 Instructor prepares lecture. Instructor prepares learning opportunities.
Beginning of Class Students have limited information about what to expect. Students have specific questions in mind to guide their learning.
  Instructor makes general assumption about what is helpful. Instructor can anticipate where students need the most help.
During Class Students try to follow along. Students practice performing the skills they are expected to learn. 
 Instructor tries to get through all the material. Instructor guides the process with feedback and mini-lectures. 
After Class Students attempt the homework, usually with delayed feedback. Students continue applying their knowledge skills after clarificationa and feedback.
 Instructor grades past work. Instructor posts any additional explanations and resources as necessary and grades higher quality work.
Office Hours Students want confirmation about what to study. Students are equipped to seek help where they know they need it.
 Instructor often repeats what was in lecture. Instructor continues guiding students toward deeper understanding.


http://ctl.utexas.edu/teaching/flipping-a-class/different

Oxford Key Concepts for the Language Classroom | Oxford University Press

Oxford Key Concepts for the Language Classroom | Oxford University Press

As teachers, we base our instructional activities on many kinds of knowledge, including our own experience—not only as teachers but also as learners. Whether intentionally or not, we often teach as we taught last year (or five years ago) or as we were taught when we were students. And when we do try to teach in a different way, it may be because we were dissatisfied with our experiences—on either side of the teacher’s desk.

http://oupeltglobalblog.com/2015/03/26/iatefl-research-and-teaching-bridging-the-gap/#respond